Of carbs and protein, that is. Carbs certainly aren’t the enemy; you can totally enjoy carbs and still lose weight. The trick is to choose something complex (like brown rice, quinoa, or whole grain bread) or something refined (like white rice, white pasta, and white bread), and pair it with a protein. So if you’re having crackers for a snack, make sure you also eat some almonds or a stick of string cheese. “I always incorporate a protein and carbohydrate at every meal,” Jim White, RD, ACSM Health, and owner of Jim White Fitness & Nutrition Studios told us in our 30 No-Diet Diet Tricks article. “It can curb your appetite and it slows down the glycemic index of some of your higher sugar foods.”
Here’s another promise that perhaps your tongue needs to hear: You will not feel deprived! If you make that single decision to prioritize food, try out some recipes, and explore some great healthy restaurants, you will be amazed at how delicious this food is. I didn’t grow up vegetarian—as a kid my favorite food was pork chops—so I’ve made the transition that I’m asking you to consider. Not only was it possible, it was the best thing I’ve ever done. Period.
With the Kind Diet, we are returning the word to its original defi nitions, for this journey is about changing how you think and live, one day at a time. And by allowing your mind and your choices to change, you will see amazing—even magical—results. It won’t happen overnight, but it will happen, I promise, because it happened to me: By eating satisfying, delicious, plant-based foods, I was released from the prison of dieting.
“Research continues to support the role of a high-protein diet and weight loss, however, we don’t want to reach those protein needs exclusively with animal proteins. Plant proteins found in beans not only help us feel full and stabilize blood sugar but beans are associated with longevity. Who cares about being skinny if you die young?” —Jennifer McDaniel, MS, RDN, CSSD, LD, food and nutrition expert
4. Core exercises – pick up a decently weighted kettlebell (maybe 25-30 lbs depending on your size and strength) and spend even 15 minutes a day doing a quick routine with them. Something like a kettlebell swing, pushups, and mason twists (this is a very common workout for me now). I do 4-6 sets of 25/15/20 of the above. It’s a great little workout and really doesn’t take any longer than 15-20 minutes.
Chapter 10 talks all about self love, and I agree it is extremely important to have. I lost a lot of respect though because it starts off saying how people who are overweight have a lack of self esteem and look down on themselves viewing themselves as inferior...um, you spent a portion of this book shaming obese people and making generalizations. You treated obese people differently and shamed them then wonder why they have low self esteem or don't feel like they fit in. This chapter meant a whole lot less to me coming from you after reading the rest of book. In this chapter while talking about self love, you spend the whole time blaming the person for their own low self esteem. Telling them that everyone has flaws (so you just told this person they are flawed, with the assumption you're talking about being overweight as a flaw because that's what the book is about and it's already obvious you look down on obese people based on your language throughout the book.)

In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?


Anaerobic exercise, on the other hand, primarily uses sugar as its fuel. This doesn’t mean that it’s not good for weight loss, though. Anaerobic exercise helps build muscle, and as we explained above, this will help you burn calories even when you’re resting. Anaerobic exercises are generally high intensity, for example sprinting and weight lifting. 
Our diets are meant to have a balance of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. When you consume too little of one of these nutrients it means you are consuming too much of another nutrient. Most people who follow a very low-fat diet end up consuming an excess amount of carbohydrates. Too much of any nutrient can cause health problems. The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) established the need for each one of these nutrients based on research for optimal health and weight. The DRI set the dietary goals at 45% to 65% from carbohydrates, 20% to 35% from fat, and 10% to 35% from protein. If you follow the Pritikin Principle it would be best to adjust your intake to meet the DRI guidelines.

Get to know the Glycemic Index (GI). It rates carbohydrates according to their effects on blood sugar. Carbs are ranked on a scale of one to 100+ (glucose is 100). Low-glycemic foods, as you would imagine, have a lower number. This means they do not spike your blood sugar, and are generally healthier for you. High-glycemic foods have a higher number; they quickly elevate your blood sugar, and are not as healthy for you. In general, I like to stay with foods that have a GI rating under 60.
If this cycle has occurred more times than you'd like to admit, you’re not alone. Setting a weight-loss goal is easy to do, but following through on it is a different story. Which is why losing weight is consistently one of the most popular resolutions, but few of us actually accomplish it. In fact, one survey found that at the end of the first week of January, 30 percent of people have already called it quits.
I am 40 years old, I weigh about 146 and I am 5’5″. I haven’t been down to 130 in a couple of years, but I have always felt more comfortable and more confident in my own skin at that weight. I wouldn’t mind to get down to 128, but how? My weight fluctuates all the time, literally, I feel like I can gain 2 lbs in a day…I dont know when your ebook will be out, but I would love to lose this weight once and for all and keep it off. As I have gotten older, it is definitely harder to lose weight and keep it off. mI do get exercise, about 20-30 mins 3-4 x a week. Can you help?? Any advice?? Thank you in advance!!
The initial phase of this diet should be avoided. This two-week phase claims to produce a weight loss of eight to 13 pounds with severe dietary restrictions; including fruit, dairy, and starches. Phases like this are usually included so people see quick results, but are limited in time because they are not nutritionally balanced and can't be followed for a long period. It tends to be more discouraging than motivating to lose quickly and to feel like you are "on a diet." Long-term weight loss and maintenance takes time, patience, and a lot of hard work. It's best to begin slowly and to always consume a nutritionally balanced diet.

One afternoon, a few years later, Christopher came home and announced that he wanted to try a macrobiotic diet. He’d read interviews with people who claimed that this diet made them feel balanced and happy and he was intrigued. I’d heard (incorrectly, as it turns out) that macrobiotics was only for sick people and that fish was a requisite part of the diet. No way was that for me! He looked at me with that sweet face of his and said, “Alright, baby. I’m going to do macrobiotics, but you don’t have to.”
While you may or may not wish to weigh yourself frequently while losing weight, regular monitoring of your weight will be essential to help you maintain your lower weight. When keeping a record of your weight, a graph may be more informative than a list of your weights. When weighing yourself and keeping a weight graph or table, however, remember that one day's diet and exercise patterns won't have a measurable effect on your weight the next day. Today's weight is not a true measure of how well you followed your program yesterday, because your body's water weight will change from day to day, and water changes are often the result of things that have nothing to do with your weight-management efforts.
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