“If weight loss is the goal, I recommend learning how to properly deadlift. Deadlifting recruits more muscle fiber at once than any other exercise. More muscle working equates to more blood flow, an increased heart rate, more metabolic demand and output. It’s compound, multi-joint and more bang for your buck, not to mention you’ll develop an excellent posterior from them.” — Victoria Viola, PN Certified Nutrition Coach, NSCA CPT, Co-Founder, Excelerate Wellness, LLC
As funny as it sounds, sleep deprivation may make you fat — and not just because you're susceptible to cases of the late-night munchies (although there's that too). There's tons of research that demonstrates getting less than the desired amount — about 7 hours — of sleep per night can slow down your metabolism. Plus, when you're awake for longer, you're naturally more likely to nosh. So don't skimp on your ZZZs, and you'll be rewarded with an extra edge when it comes to shedding pounds quickly.
In the section on why people become obese it mentions eating too much, sedentary lifestyle, and not sleeping enough. While I won't deny these are all reasons for an increase in weight, it fails to also mention medical conditions and medications. These are both areas that should not be left out and it seems this book was only targeted at people to try to make them feel bad about their weight gain so they'll want to lose weight. (which by the way is not a good technique of motivation, which is one of the things the book promises to provide). The thing is, while yes many factors leading up to obesity are based on our own habits and behaviors and if we want to lose weight we have to take responsibility for those. That's absolutely true. But I feel like this book is so caught up in that area that it's forgetting to share the entire story.
Weight can affect a person's self-esteem. Excess weight is highly visible and evokes some powerful reactions, however unfairly, from other people and from the people who carry the excess weight. The amount of weight loss needed to improve your health may be much less than you wish to lose, when you consider how you evaluate your weight. Research has shown that your health can be greatly improved by a loss of 5–10 percent of your starting weight. That doesn't mean you have to stop there, but it does mean that an initial goal of losing 5–10 percent of your starting weight is both realistic and valuable.
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