I am a 21 year old girl. I am 4’11 & weigh 149.91 lbs/ 68 kg. My BMI is 30.2 that means i am “OBESE”. I need to decrease my weight to at least 55 kg. I have been going to gym for 2 months now and workout 3-4 days every week for 2.5-3hrs. I do the treadmill, elliptical trainer & stationary bike. I have reduced my calorie intake by 800-1000 per day. I have completely avoided junk food,soft drinks and dairy stuffs. But i have a problem of ocassional over eating due to stress and emotional breakdowns. I have been 72kg when i started gym and i reduced to 68kg. But now i have been stuck on 68kg. I don’t know what to do anymore. It’s like i have given up. 🙁
If you’ve been eating fast food for years, get real about your approach: You’re probably not going to stick to an organic, gluten-free, paleo overhaul for very long. “You want to change as little as possible to create calorie deficit,” says Dr. Seltzer, who insists the best way to support sustainable weight loss is to incorporate small changes into existing habits. So instead of giving up your daily BLT bagels in favor of an egg-white wrap, try ordering your sandwich on a lighter English muffin. Or say you eat a snack bar every afternoon: Swap your 300-calorie bar for a 150-calorie alternative. “Your brain will feel the same way about it, so you won’t feel deprived,” he says.
By the way, this isn’t a lifestyle designed for celebrities and rich people. I’m not selling you some glamorous program that requires ridiculous equipment, fancy private sessions, or expensive creams. This radiant health is available to every single one of us because it’s nature’s way. I love that! And these days, the food is even cheap; trade in steak for grains and beans, and your grocery bill goes down. Find a local farmers’ market for great prices on organic vegetables. Or even grow your own! You may find, over time, that you see your doctor less often. That you walk more and drive less. That you don’t need that frappuccino, antacid, or sleeping pill.
Know your why: “When you set a goal, write down why that goal is important to you. Because when you mess up — and you will — you can go back and read what you wrote and why it was meaningful and that will make you remember why you started," says Delaney. "When you fail — because everyone will fail at some point — go back to the book and remember why you set the goal in the first place.”
Changing the way you go about eating can make it easier to eat less without feeling deprived. It takes 15 or more minutes for your brain to get the message that you've been fed. Eating slowly will help you feel satisfied. Eating lots of vegetables and fruits can make you feel fuller. Another trick is to use smaller plates so that moderate portions do not appear too small. Changing your eating schedule, or setting one, can be helpful, especially if you tend to skip, or delay, meals and overeat later.
“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.

“If weight loss is the goal, I recommend learning how to properly deadlift. Deadlifting recruits more muscle fiber at once than any other exercise. More muscle working equates to more blood flow, an increased heart rate, more metabolic demand and output. It’s compound, multi-joint and more bang for your buck, not to mention you’ll develop an excellent posterior from them.” — Victoria Viola, PN Certified Nutrition Coach, NSCA CPT, Co-Founder, Excelerate Wellness, LLC

To prep his patients for success, Dr. Seltzer tells them to plan around a large evening meal by eating a lighter breakfast and lunch—NBD since most people who eat a meal before bed tend to wake up feeling relatively full, he says. Research suggests balanced bedtime meals may also promote steady next-day blood sugar levels, which also helps with appetite regulation.
Red wine can actually be good for your health, thanks to the antioxidant resveratrol, which studies have shown is good for your health and could help you lose weight. But any more than one glass, and you’re opening yourself up to extra sugar, empty calories, and a boozy buzz, which may inhibit your ability to make healthy food choices. If you’re out to happy hour, stop at one glass and opt for club soda (which is calorie free) or water with lemon instead.

Useful goals should be (1) specific; (2) attainable (doable); and (3) forgiving (less than perfect). "Exercise more" is a great goal, but it's not specific. "Walk 5 miles every day" is specific and measurable, but is it doable if you're just starting out? "Walk 30 minutes every day" is more attainable, but what happens if you're held up at work one day and there's a thunderstorm during your walking time another day? "Walk 30 minutes, 5 days each week" is specific, doable, and forgiving. In short, a great goal!
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