To stay fit and maintain your shape a regular workout helps a lot. But when it comes to losing weight and getting back in shape, a regular workout or exercise routine won’t suffice. You will have to take it a step further and take care of your diet in order to lose weight. Even the gym instructors would tell you so. Exercise and diet are the two sides of a coin. You can’t achieve weight loss with just one of them. A regular exercise routine and a healthy diet is your route to salvation.
Sleeping for more than five hours a night might seem like a luxury for some, but it can have a serious impact on your overall health. Not getting the recommended 7-8 hours of shut-eye a night puts you at risk for fatigue the next day, which means you’re more likely to crave and snack on high-calorie comfort food. Try to go to bed sooner so you can get a little more sleep, which will help you eat less. And to blast fat even faster, don’t miss these essential 55 Ways to Boost Your Metabolism.

Hey Adam, it’s great to see you’re leading a healthy lifestyle and reaping the benefits of a good diet and exercise. My question is, what do you recommend for someone who isn’t overweight per se, but could still afford to lose a few pounds? I have less than 20 lbs that I need to lose before I get a flat stomach to start working on my abs. I’m a taller guy (above 6ft) if that makes any difference. What kind of exercise should I be doing?
“There are many foods that aid weight loss, but one that I often recommend to my clients and eat myself is grapefruit. Researchers at Scripps Clinic in San Diego found that when obese people ate half a grapefruit before each meal, they dropped an average of 3.5 pounds over 12 weeks. Apparently, the tangy fruit can lower insulin, a fat-storage hormone, and that can lead to weight loss. Plus, since it’s at least 90% water, it can fill you up so you eat less. However, if you are on certain medications you should not have grapefruit or grapefruit juice, so check the label on all your prescriptions, or ask your pharmacist or doctor. — Patricia Bannan, MS, RDN, author of  Eat Right When Time is Tight.
Also some research shows that the human body is primed to consume most of its calories during daylight hours. But the lifestyle is problematic for many: Because family meals and dinners with friends often are scheduled for after sunset, “people who try to stop eating after 7pm can’t do it every day for the rest of their lives,” says Dr. Seltzer, who supports an alternative strategy: Eating a hearty meal at your regular dinnertime.
It is possible to do more in less time — at least when it comes to your workouts. By incorporating interval training — that means bursts of high-intensity moves — you’ll give your metabolism a huge boost, says Glenn Gaesser, Ph.D., director of the Kinesiology Program at the University of Virginia and author of The Spark. If you usually jog at a consistent pace, try adding a 30-second to one-minute sprint every five minutes, or, if you’re on a treadmill, change up the incline for one-minute intervals.
‘Did you know that gluten makes some people emotionally unstable? There are reports of people having psychotic episodes when they’re exposed to gluten.’ Where is the reference? If this is anecdotal that should be made clear in the text. The article is littered with claims that appear to be anecdotal, yet is written as if these statements were fact. They may well be, but without robust randomised and controlled studies to back the author’s claims it’s really just a suspicion based on anecdotal evidence. If I’m going to risk developing disordered eating by following a ‘strict elimination diet’ I want to see facts not anecdotal evidence. Not impressed, ADDitude!
"Self-monitoring" refers to observing and recording some aspect of your behavior, such as calorie intake, servings of fruits and vegetables, amount of physical activity, etc., or an outcome of these behaviors, such as weight. Self-monitoring of a behavior can be used at times when you're not sure how you're doing, and at times when you want the behavior to improve. Self-monitoring of a behavior usually moves you closer to the desired direction and can produce "real-time" records for review by you and your health care provider. For example, keeping a record of your physical activity can let you and your provider know quickly how you're doing. When the record shows that your activity is increasing, you'll be encouraged to keep it up. Some patients find that specific self-monitoring forms make it easier, while others prefer to use their own recording system.
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