“A study by David Jenkins, MD, PhD—the University of Toronto pioneer in low-glycemic eating — demonstrates that eating small portions at frequent intervals is good for your health in a number of remarkable ways. Within the study, they found that people who ate every three hours reduced their blood cholesterol by over 15% and their blood insulin by almost 28%. That’s key, because in addition to regulating your blood sugar level, insulin plays a pivotal role in fat metabolism, inflammation and the progression to metabolic syndrome. When your body produces less insulin, you’re much less likely to convert dietary calories into body fat.
Adam thank you for the feedback. I will certainly switch to cream and see if that helps and maybe eliminate the wine. I have been using that as a “treat” at night. It is a dry red-pinor noir. Dinner is usually fish, chicken or pork with veggies. I do not always eat beans or lentils with dinner but work them in when I can. It is a challenge to cook for myself and then my husband and kids.

Research has shown that the calorie density of our diets will impact our weight. The calorie density is the amount of calories in a given weight of food. Consuming foods that are considered low-calorie dense aids in weight loss. These foods will provide a high volume without a lot of calories. By replacing foods that are considered high-calorie dense, you save additional calories. Some find it more satisfying to focus on consuming low-calorie dense foods in large quantities versus counting calories. The Pritikin diet also encourages daily exercise and stress-reduction techniques.
My moment of clarity came when I went on a trip to the funfair with my eldest son – he wanted to ride on the roller-coaster, it was his first time and he was so excited, but when the safety bar came down it wouldn’t fit over me. We both had to get out of the car in front of everyone – people I knew and who my son went to school with. Humiliating (for me and for him) is an understatement.

You need to be an educated consumer when it comes to weight loss. It's not enough to see that a doctor is the author of a book. You need to digest what is being said, and look for the facts supporting the claims. It takes modifications in behavior, diet, and activity to succeed at weight loss. It also takes time, patience, commitment, and lots of hard work. There will never be one diet that is the "cure" for everyone. If you are having difficulties with weight loss, seek helf from your physician. Dieting is a complex issue and ongoing professional support may be needed for success. It is possible to lose weight and keep it off, so never give up hope. Instead, find what works best for you right now, and be open to change as you go along.


As funny as it sounds, sleep deprivation may make you fat — and not just because you're susceptible to cases of the late-night munchies (although there's that too). There's tons of research that demonstrates getting less than the desired amount — about 7 hours — of sleep per night can slow down your metabolism. Plus, when you're awake for longer, you're naturally more likely to nosh. So don't skimp on your ZZZs, and you'll be rewarded with an extra edge when it comes to shedding pounds quickly.

There’s no way to sugarcoat this: Your TV is making you fat. It prevents you from being active, gives you the munchies, and makes you distracted while you’re eating. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that people who ate in front of the TV consumed 10 percent more than they normally would. Eating while distracted disrupts your satiety signals, so shutting off all your electronics while munching will help you stick to your portions, and feel full.

– My biggest “trouble spot” is the SPARE TIRE/BELLY I have acquired around my waist & upper “back fat.” I used to be incredibly disciplined about doing core exercises when I was (much) younger, as daily physical therapy for my scoliosis – But, I have allowed everything else to take priority (like kids, family, job, other “duties”). I feel selfish and guilty spending time just working out – helping myself. Any suggestions on (quick) CORE exercises/weight management?


I have harmonica l problem as i don’t get regular dates , m so worried so even i can suicide because due to this i have increased with 10 kg wait i want to reduce that so my this prob get solved as Dr. said that Ur body getting air filled due to this i don’t want to go for medical treatment i want some natural steps for it to better ma self again in shape . pls help me i don’t like somebody call me mottii every tym ….as i have increased wait within 6 months form 52 — 62 now m sad pls help me i m ready to follow this plan will it work soon on me????
In the first chapter the author doesn't take long to start body shaming people. In the section of how obesity is measured the author tells you that if you have unequal distribution of fats, if you have a protruding tummy or bulging thighs it can make you look unattractive. Gee, thanks for the judgement there. Let's keep it to the facts and not the attractiveness opinions of others. Really, another person's opinion of how attractive I am based on my body shape is not a good measurement of obesity.

According to most interviews, Hugh regularly drank protein shakes before and after his workouts. Outside of a protein supplement, all of his other nutrients came from natural foods. He most likely took additional supplements not directly tied to gaining size such as a multivitamin and fish oil pill. In fact, a study from the Department of Health Sciences at Getty College has shown that individuals who consume a routine fish oil supplement end up with higher amounts of fat free mass over the course of a few months.

Over the past few months I’ve really learnt to control my junk food addiction and LARGE portions.. So cutting out junk food completely isn’t an issue for me and I’ve learnt to reduce my portion sizes quite vastly but I sometimes find it a little difficult. I absolutely LOVE RICE AND PASTA. However, I now only have pasta once a month if so. Also, I practically LIVE on rice and oatmeal.. Having oatmeal for breakfast 7 days a week and sometimes even for lunch. I have rice once a day or every other day.. Would brown rice grains be ok and would brown pasta be ok?
Changing the way you go about eating can make it easier to eat less without feeling deprived. It takes 15 or more minutes for your brain to get the message that you've been fed. Eating slowly will help you feel satisfied. Eating lots of vegetables and fruits can make you feel fuller. Another trick is to use smaller plates so that moderate portions do not appear too small. Changing your eating schedule, or setting one, can be helpful, especially if you tend to skip, or delay, meals and overeat later.
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