If you’re logging just a few hours of sleep a night, you may actually find yourself gaining weight. Researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center found that subjects who slept just four hours had a harder time processing carbs. "When you're exhausted, your body lacks the energy to do its normal day-to-day functions, which includes burning calories efficiently," says Talbott.
Beans are an excellent source of slow-release carbohydrates, as well as a good source of protein and fiber, which slow the digestive process to help you stay fuller, longer. “Research finds that eating just three-quarters of a cup of beans a day for six weeks can help you lose close to six pounds. And if you’re trying to lower your cholesterol, it’s a double win as the soluble fiber in beans helps whisk cholesterol out of your body,” says Ansel. She also says you don’t necessarily need to cook dry beans from scratch. Canned beans are one of the most underrated convenience foods, so keep a rotation of all kinds - like black, pinto, chickpea and cannellini - in your pantry. Try adding beans to your soups and salads, add them minced to meat dishes, enjoy a bean dip like hummus, or toss them in a salad.
But that’s not all. One of the things I love best about the Kind Diet is that you will actually become part of the solution to our global problems. Following a plant-based diet dials down our insane consumption of resources like fresh water, oil, coal, and the precious rain forest. It helps to heal the environment by denying support to toxic food industries. It is a significant move toward ending world hunger and distributing food more equitably.
In the section on why people become obese it mentions eating too much, sedentary lifestyle, and not sleeping enough. While I won't deny these are all reasons for an increase in weight, it fails to also mention medical conditions and medications. These are both areas that should not be left out and it seems this book was only targeted at people to try to make them feel bad about their weight gain so they'll want to lose weight. (which by the way is not a good technique of motivation, which is one of the things the book promises to provide). The thing is, while yes many factors leading up to obesity are based on our own habits and behaviors and if we want to lose weight we have to take responsibility for those. That's absolutely true. But I feel like this book is so caught up in that area that it's forgetting to share the entire story.
You want to eliminate bad fats from your meals — trans fats, fried fats, and fat from cheaply raised, industrially farmed animals that are fed corn and soy. Fats found in pizza, ice cream, and cheeseburgers fool the brain into ignoring the signals that tell your brain that you are full. They disrupt the hormones that send those signals to your brain. Focus on healthy fats, especially those that contain omega-3 fatty acids, found in foods like salmon, sardines, avocados, walnuts, chia seeds, and dark green leafy vegetables.
Apparently designed for would-be army recruits to lose weight before selection, there have been no direct ties between the military diet and any military group. Regardless, the military diet requires followers to eat very specific foods for breakfast, lunch and dinner over the three days. For the remaining four days, it relaxes — albeit only slightly, as you can eat up to 1500kcal. For reference, most active men need 2200-2600kcal daily. This is what 500kcal looks like.

Useful goals should be (1) specific; (2) attainable (doable); and (3) forgiving (less than perfect). "Exercise more" is a great goal, but it's not specific. "Walk 5 miles every day" is specific and measurable, but is it doable if you're just starting out? "Walk 30 minutes every day" is more attainable, but what happens if you're held up at work one day and there's a thunderstorm during your walking time another day? "Walk 30 minutes, 5 days each week" is specific, doable, and forgiving. In short, a great goal!
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