And finally, do you feel like you’re at peace with yourself? Comfortable in your own body? In your life? Or are you constantly battling yourself (or others), never feeling whole or balanced? Do you feel like you’re in touch with your heart—your authentic self? I know it might sound crazy to say that your diet is behind that, too, but it is. When you begin to eat whole grains and abstain from craz-ymaking foods like white sugar, you will see how amazing and joyous and peaceful life really is.

Hi. I weigh 220 and am 5’8’’. I’m obviously overweight but I’m not in terrible shape, I play sports twice a week and try to run one or two times a week also. I have a 5K coming up in 2 weeks and I plan to do an event on June 1 where I need to be 210 pounds. I don’t want to stop at 210, I want to be back under 200 again. I don’t think I eat terrible, I eat granola in the morning and lunch during the week and try not to go nuts at nighttime. My vice is beer on the weekends, I am not an alcoholic but I can easily put back a six-pack if I wanted to on a Friday or Saturday night when hanging out with friends. Other than the beer, I only drink water, green tea, and coffee – no sodas or sugary drinks.

It sounds silly, but switching which hand you eat with can save you calories, and help boost weight loss. “It takes 15 minutes for your brain to realize that you’re full,” celebrity personal trainer Jay Cardiello told us in our article 40 Weight Loss Tips for Over 40. “To give your mind time to catch up to your mouth, simply switch your fork to non-dominate hand. It may be frustrating, but it’s a simple and unnoticeable way to curb overeating and lose weight.”

Some popular beliefs attached to weight loss have been shown to either have less effect on weight loss as commonly believed or are actively unhealthy. According to Harvard Health, the idea of metabolism being the "key to weight" is "part truth and part myth" as while metabolism does affect weight loss, external forces such as diet and exercise have an equal effect.[44] They also commented that the idea of changing one's rate of metabolism is under debate.[44] Diet plans in fitness magazines are also often believed to be effective, but may actually be harmful by limiting the daily intake of important calories and nutrients which can be detrimental depending on the person and are even capable of driving individuals away from weight loss.[45]
The common mistakes people make to lose weight section is decent, however I felt it was lacking. People make a lot more than just 3 common mistakes, which are crash dieting, too much exercise and checking weight too often. I'd like to see this section more fully covered because a better understanding of why these are bad, as well as other mistakes that weren't even mentioned, are going to help people make better choices in the future. Overall this is an important section that was sort of glossed over.
Useful goals should be (1) specific; (2) attainable (doable); and (3) forgiving (less than perfect). "Exercise more" is a great goal, but it's not specific. "Walk 5 miles every day" is specific and measurable, but is it doable if you're just starting out? "Walk 30 minutes every day" is more attainable, but what happens if you're held up at work one day and there's a thunderstorm during your walking time another day? "Walk 30 minutes, 5 days each week" is specific, doable, and forgiving. In short, a great goal!
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