I’m 5′ 2″ or so, and about 102 pounds. I’m 19. Not that long ago, I was only 94 or so, and I eat very healthy (lean protein, fruits, vegetables). My one “no-no” is Starbucks in the morning, but I’ve always done that, even when I was thin. I want to drop the 8 pounds I gained ASAP. I used to be very tone, and I feel like all that has gone away. What do I need to do. Please help.

Know your why: “When you set a goal, write down why that goal is important to you. Because when you mess up — and you will — you can go back and read what you wrote and why it was meaningful and that will make you remember why you started," says Delaney. "When you fail — because everyone will fail at some point — go back to the book and remember why you set the goal in the first place.”
HIIT stands for high intensity interval training, and it’s a great way to build muscle without spending hours in the gym. The idea is to go all out for a short period of time, followed by a slower pace that allows you to recover. Think of jogging or sprinting all out for 30 seconds, followed by a minute or two of rest, then repeat. Short bursts of high-intensity exercises keep your heart rate up while adding lean muscle. More muscle mass equals calories burned on a daily basis. Also, the more lean muscle you have, the higher your metabolism is.
Weight can affect a person's self-esteem. Excess weight is highly visible and evokes some powerful reactions, however unfairly, from other people and from the people who carry the excess weight. The amount of weight loss needed to improve your health may be much less than you wish to lose, when you consider how you evaluate your weight. Research has shown that your health can be greatly improved by a loss of 5–10 percent of your starting weight. That doesn't mean you have to stop there, but it does mean that an initial goal of losing 5–10 percent of your starting weight is both realistic and valuable.
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