Ironically, I was exploring another diet dimension myself at the time—raw foods. I was eating tons of fruit, nuts, and other cool, uncooked delicacies. Although I felt fine in sunny California, when I went to snowy, cold Manhattan to appear opposite Kathleen Turner and Jason Biggs in The Graduate on Broadway, it was another story. After a few days of work, my body felt cold and my energy was low, but I was determined to stick to my raw regimen. Between rehearsals, I would go out into the winter weather to hunt down wheatgrass juice, pineapples, and mangoes. I found them—it was New York, after all—but I wasn’t feeling all that good. My brain didn’t want to know, but my body was giving me signals that I was out of balance.
Overall I do not recommend this book. While it provides some okay information buried in the words somewhere, this is a lot of common knowledge and you can find it online all over the place free. I've found all of this info and more on Spark People, which is a free community. The book is misleading, judgemental, makes generalizations about people who are obese, and tries to sell you something at every turn. I would skip this book and seek out a free resource that will offer you everything this book has to offer and more, plus in a non-judgemental tone.
According to the website, the military diet is great for “weight loss emergencies” — an uncomfortable phrase in itself — such as, fitting “into a wedding dress pronto…or [if] your ex is coming to town and you want make them drool”. As with most things nutrition and fitness, it doesn’t discriminate according to gender, although the military diet is extremely calorie-restrictive — which can affect women’s fertility and hormone levels. For men, symptoms like nausea, migraines and extreme mood fluctuations are likely to occur.
Also, men tend to lose weight where they need it most (read: belly), so it's often more immediately noticeable when overweight men start trimming down than when women do, as ladies' fat stores are typically more spread out, which is partly why they tend to lose weight at a slower pace than guys. Even basic, regular exercise -- ideally 30 to 60 minutes a day -- tends to reduce abdominal obesity, even if guys don’t technically lose weight.
Hi Priyanka, I have gone through ur article n I must say its really interesting.I am a 22 year old girl working in IT industry so most of the time of my day is spent in sitting in front of computer.Which is leading to increase area of my tummy and size of my waist 😛 . I am planning to start this diet plan from 1st August. Hoping to loose some good amount of weight in a month.

In the first chapter the author doesn't take long to start body shaming people. In the section of how obesity is measured the author tells you that if you have unequal distribution of fats, if you have a protruding tummy or bulging thighs it can make you look unattractive. Gee, thanks for the judgement there. Let's keep it to the facts and not the attractiveness opinions of others. Really, another person's opinion of how attractive I am based on my body shape is not a good measurement of obesity.

Stress may contribute to abdominal fat, according to several studies, including a recent one at the University of California, San Francisco. "When you're stressed, hormones like cortisol stimulate your appetite, slow your metabolism down and encourage fat storage inside your abdomen," explains Shawn Talbott, Ph.D., director of the Nutrition Clinic at the University of Utah. So what's a frazzled girl to do? "Find an activity that reduces stress for you, whether it's listening to soothing music or taking yoga, and do it daily," advises Talbott.


Useful goals should be (1) specific; (2) attainable (doable); and (3) forgiving (less than perfect). "Exercise more" is a great goal, but it's not specific. "Walk 5 miles every day" is specific and measurable, but is it doable if you're just starting out? "Walk 30 minutes every day" is more attainable, but what happens if you're held up at work one day and there's a thunderstorm during your walking time another day? "Walk 30 minutes, 5 days each week" is specific, doable, and forgiving. In short, a great goal!
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