The above diet does work. In fact we’re coming out with an eBook in a few days that will layout exactly what to eat for a 2-week time period, including complete grocery shopping list and daily meals. The thing about this particular diet is that you need to be pretty strict with managing blood sugar levels in order to see the type of results in the 4-5 pounds per week range.

There’s no way to sugarcoat this: Your TV is making you fat. It prevents you from being active, gives you the munchies, and makes you distracted while you’re eating. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that people who ate in front of the TV consumed 10 percent more than they normally would. Eating while distracted disrupts your satiety signals, so shutting off all your electronics while munching will help you stick to your portions, and feel full.


When I first went to this dietician, he told me to get some blood tests done. Like thyroid checkup, blood sugar, serum insulin in my case since I have PCOD. So it’s just not about losing weight but getting to know the underlying reason of piling on the kilos. In my case it was increased serum insulin levels. But in my cousins case all her tests were ok, she was gaining weight because of her erratic routine and the junk food she so loved. So if you think that you are doing everything right but still gaining weight, the first thing you should be doing is finding the underlying reason for it.
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