Get to know the Glycemic Index (GI). It rates carbohydrates according to their effects on blood sugar. Carbs are ranked on a scale of one to 100+ (glucose is 100). Low-glycemic foods, as you would imagine, have a lower number. This means they do not spike your blood sugar, and are generally healthier for you. High-glycemic foods have a higher number; they quickly elevate your blood sugar, and are not as healthy for you. In general, I like to stay with foods that have a GI rating under 60.
Finally, some chapters I have no problems with! Chapter 6 has some good advice on how to create and use a food diary, and not just to record what you're eating, but to find out what your bad habits are so you can start to recognize them and fix them. I'll be honest, I'm not even aware of the bad habits I have related to how I eat (not just what I eat) and this method is actually good advice on how to achieve it without shaming anyone or making assumptions and generalizations! Chapter 7 is all about stopping food cravings with some great advice. Chapter 8 provides some great advice of creating a physical activity habit (throwing the entire without working out part out the window, but hey, what's a little misleading advertising to get you to open the book. I mean, we already discovered that the whole title was a scam when the author promised to help you lose weight fast yet tells you not to lose weight fast). Chapter 9 provides some decent information about nutrition, though I think this is a far bigger topic than what could be covered in a short chapter of a book.
According to most interviews, Hugh regularly drank protein shakes before and after his workouts. Outside of a protein supplement, all of his other nutrients came from natural foods. He most likely took additional supplements not directly tied to gaining size such as a multivitamin and fish oil pill. In fact, a study from the Department of Health Sciences at Getty College has shown that individuals who consume a routine fish oil supplement end up with higher amounts of fat free mass over the course of a few months.
But it's important to remember that "fat" doesn't mean "unhealthy." Yes, women have larger fat stores, but it's part of their physiology, meaning it's not extra weight. So if a woman has 11 percent more body fat than a man, it doesn't mean she's 11 percent "fatter." A perfectly fit woman will still hold six to 11 percent more body fat than a perfectly fit man.

Weight can affect a person's self-esteem. Excess weight is highly visible and evokes some powerful reactions, however unfairly, from other people and from the people who carry the excess weight. The amount of weight loss needed to improve your health may be much less than you wish to lose, when you consider how you evaluate your weight. Research has shown that your health can be greatly improved by a loss of 5–10 percent of your starting weight. That doesn't mean you have to stop there, but it does mean that an initial goal of losing 5–10 percent of your starting weight is both realistic and valuable.
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