1.   PureGym is the UK's leading gym operator providing low-cost and high-quality fitness facilities for one million members spread across more than 200 sites. PureGym was launched in 2009 and pioneered the model for affordable, flexible, high-quality fitness clubs in the UK. Members pay monthly and have no contract commitment. Most of its gyms are open 24 hours a day across the UK and offer a full range of top of the line equipment including cardiovascular equipment, fixed-resistance and free weights. Each gym typically offers over 220 pieces of fitness equipment and up to 80 group exercise classes each week delivered by around 2,200 personal trainers. In November 2017, affiliates of Leonard Green & Partners, L.P. acquired a controlling interest in the business. The business has appeared 4 times on the Sunday Times Fast Track Top 100 list, won awards as the overall Fast Track Brand of the Year in 2017 and the Fast Track Outstanding Achievement Award in 2018, and was a winner of the Virgin Media Disruptor Award in 2016.
PureGym has redefined the industry with its affordable, high-quality and no-contract offering, and the success of this strategy is reflected in the company's continued growth. Launched in November 2009, in February this year, PureGym reached one million members - a milestone never previously achieved by a UK gym group - and in March opened its 200th site. In addition to the acquisition of Soho Gyms, PureGym plans to open at least 20 gyms a year - extending its position as the UK's leading gym operator. On average PureGym members pay around £20 per month compared to typical average prices in the market of around £40. Members benefit from fully equipped facilities and between 50 and 80 classes per week included in the monthly membership price.
"I would like to say it is ready to replace liposuction, but it's not -- yet," he says. Still it does have certain benefits over liposuction namely that a person can have the treatment and go to lunch afterward, Fodor says. Unlike liposuction, the new technology does not involve pain, scars, anesthesia, or a long recovery time. Only some topical anesthesia is used, he says.
ASAPS formed an ad hoc committee to further investigate the pros and cons of mesotherapy, he says. "We don't know whether it works or not because it is used by a lot of people who inject all kinds of chemicals into the skin," Fodor explains. "Our committee looked at the literature and we found no uniformity to what is being used, how much is being injected, and where it is being injected, so we could not draw any conclusions," he says. That's why ASAPS is conducting a clinical trial at five centers to definitively answer questions about mesotherapy. "We will do some studies with an exact and rigid protocol so we can compare apples to apples, not apples to oranges," he says.
1 July 2015: The CMA is considering whether it is or may be the case that this transaction has resulted in the creation of a relevant merger situation under the merger provisions of the Enterprise Act 2002 and, if so, whether the creation of that situation has resulted, or may be expected to result, in a substantial lessening of competition within any market or markets in the United Kingdom for goods or services.
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