ASAPS formed an ad hoc committee to further investigate the pros and cons of mesotherapy, he says. "We don't know whether it works or not because it is used by a lot of people who inject all kinds of chemicals into the skin," Fodor explains. "Our committee looked at the literature and we found no uniformity to what is being used, how much is being injected, and where it is being injected, so we could not draw any conclusions," he says. That's why ASAPS is conducting a clinical trial at five centers to definitively answer questions about mesotherapy. "We will do some studies with an exact and rigid protocol so we can compare apples to apples, not apples to oranges," he says.
CoolSculpting works by taking advantage of the fact that fat cells are more sensitive to cold than the other cells around them. This basic scientific fact was first discovered in 1970 by doctors observing children who sucked on popsicles for hours, and ended up having first soreness, and later dimples, caused by loss of fat cells! Fast forward about 20 years, and Harvard scientists revisited this fact, and realized that they could turn this science into a system for aesthetic sculpting of fatty bulges. The key was to find the ‘sweet spot’ of time and temperature, which would kill some fat cells but not damage surrounding structures such as skin. They called the public company that makes the systems Zeltiq. The proof of the success of this concept and treatment: Zeltiq was bought out by Allergan in 2016 for whopping 2.5 billion! This was the largest sale of a single medical device company in history.
CoolSculpting works by taking advantage of the fact that fat cells are more sensitive to cold than the other cells around them. This basic scientific fact was first discovered in 1970 by doctors observing children who sucked on popsicles for hours, and ended up having first soreness, and later dimples, caused by loss of fat cells! Fast forward about 20 years, and Harvard scientists revisited this fact, and realized that they could turn this science into a system for aesthetic sculpting of fatty bulges. The key was to find the ‘sweet spot’ of time and temperature, which would kill some fat cells but not damage surrounding structures such as skin. They called the public company that makes the systems Zeltiq. The proof of the success of this concept and treatment: Zeltiq was bought out by Allergan in 2016 for whopping 2.5 billion! This was the largest sale of a single medical device company in history.
The most commonly known treatment is liposuction, a surgical procedure with inherent risks that many patients wish to avoid. Now, less invasive energy-based alternatives are available, including energy-assisted liposuction, which is usually gentler in comparison to regular liposuction. Recently, completely non-invasive treatments are showing up in the market but results are less predictable and less impressive.
1 July 2015: The CMA is considering whether it is or may be the case that this transaction has resulted in the creation of a relevant merger situation under the merger provisions of the Enterprise Act 2002 and, if so, whether the creation of that situation has resulted, or may be expected to result, in a substantial lessening of competition within any market or markets in the United Kingdom for goods or services.
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