The most commonly known treatment is liposuction, a surgical procedure with inherent risks that many patients wish to avoid. Now, less invasive energy-based alternatives are available, including energy-assisted liposuction, which is usually gentler in comparison to regular liposuction. Recently, completely non-invasive treatments are showing up in the market but results are less predictable and less impressive.

"Be aware that we live in a very competitive environment whereby youth is king and people are looking for less-invasive procedures, and these procedures are now for the first time being directly marketed by the manufacturer in consumer magazines," points out session moderator Franklin L. DiSpaltro, MD, a plastic surgeon in West Orange, N.J., and a past president of ASAPS.
Incisions are hidden in natural folds or stretch marks. During the procedure, the patient is awake and comfortable. After the procedure is finished, the incisions are closed and a surgical garment or binder is recommended to provide support. It is usually worn for about 3 weeks, which is how long full recovery will take. Most patients are able to go back to a desk job in 2-3 days.
Here’s another way to look at it: Our fat calls are basically our microscopic safe-deposit boxes where we store fat, which is the body’s reserve source of fuel and energy. Remember, we have evolved over many thousands of years to survive prolonged periods of starvation. So our bodies are brilliantly programmed to convert any excess calories we eat into fat, and store it in our fat cells. Unlike the safe-deposit boxes you find at the bank, which are made of steel, fat cells are amazingly flexible. They grow bigger and bigger when excess fat is deposited into them, such as after a rich meal. And they shrink down to near-nothingness when we aren’t eating enough calories and so we make ‘withdrawals’ of fat to help feed the body.
1 July 2015: The CMA is considering whether it is or may be the case that this transaction has resulted in the creation of a relevant merger situation under the merger provisions of the Enterprise Act 2002 and, if so, whether the creation of that situation has resulted, or may be expected to result, in a substantial lessening of competition within any market or markets in the United Kingdom for goods or services.
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